Search results for ‘The unborn

Satipatthana Sutta

There is this one way for the purification of beings, for the overcoming of sorrows and griefs, for the going down of sufferings and miseries, for winning the right path, for realizing nibbana, that is to say, the four applications of mindfulness. The Buddha

Understanding Karma and Rebirth

Rebirth and reincarnation are generally accepted realities in the East and have been since ancient times. What the next life will be is usually the question rather than whether it will be. In the West, on the other hand, we have our own religious and secular beliefs which usually do not include living another life, or at least not in this world or in this way…

Son master Chinul

Sentient beings deceive themselves through their own actions. They themselves per­ceive that “this is an ordinary man,” “this is a saint,” “this is oneself,” “this is someone else,”…

Is there any possibility of developing more compassion? By the Dalai Lama

Suppose a person stays in an empty, remote place—just a person alone—very healthy, highly educated, very wise, and physically very strong. As that person lives alone, there’s no possibility of his becoming wealthy or famous; there’s no possibility of his producing good food or building good shelter; he cannot become a hero. All benefits of this worldly life are entirely dependent upon other factors, mainly on other human beings…

Purpose and the Search for Happiness, by John Aske

The parallels with the story of the young Prince Siddhartha 2500 years earlier are clear. As childhood with its certainties (if we are lucky) and its securities, moves into adolescence and then maturity, we are all confronted with the opportunity of opening up to the world (and ourselves) and exploring it, or turning away from it and trying to restore the gilded cage we once lived in…

Buddha, by Ajahn Sumedho

Rather than trying to seek for Buddha or truth (dhamma) in terms of some idea or some doctrinal dogma that we might form around the concepts of Buddha and dhamma, the Buddha pointed to suffering and its cause. By recognising its cause as attachment to desire, we let go. When we let go of the cause, then we realise the cessation of suffering. The Buddha was actually teaching the way of nonsuffering. The Eightfold Path is really the experience of nonsuffering, in the present, in the here-and-now…