‘Requiem for a Faith’ Huston Smith

Requiem for a Faith.Film: Requiem for a Faith, shot in the late 1960s examines the customs and traditions of Tibetan Buddhism. Though dated, it stands the test of time.

Huston Smith the religious philosopher and author (The World’s Religions), provides a very moving and insightful narration.

He explains the tenets of Tibets unique brand of Buddhism, while noted spiritual filmmaker Elda Hartley provides astonishing footage.

About 27 minutes.

Requiem for a FaithOriginally produced and distributed by the Hartley Film Foundation. In a country where one-sixth of the males become monks, all things are religious in Tibet, according to narrator Huston Smith. The religious philosopher and author (The World’s Religions) explains the tenets of the Tibetan’s unique brand of Buddhism, while noted spiritual filmmaker Elda Hartley provides astonishing footage of monks engaged in discussions with dance-like movement, the faithful making strings of prayer flags and artisans carving prayer blocks and ceremonial masks. Smith’s prose ranges from poetic to over the top (“a society left on the shelf, set in amber, left in deep freeze”), but Hartley’s range (from breathtaking skyscapes to small moments like a monk protectively removing a single snail from an oft-trodden path) may justify Smith’s enthusiasm. Tibet had already been long occupied by China when this 27-minute documentary was shot in the late 1960s, and unfortunately, nothing has changed for the Tibetan people since.
Special thanks to Kendra Smith.

 



Categories: Buddhist video, Tibetan, Tibetan Buddhism

Tags: , ,

1 reply

  1. Interesting. Like the modern condensing by the spiritual leader into compassion and kindness.

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