Why do you want this holy water? By Ajahn Chah

The worldly way is to do things for a reason, to get some return, but in Buddhism we do things without the idea of gaining anything…

Bridge over a Pond of Water Lilies, Claude Monet (French, Paris 1840–1926 Giverny) © The Metropolitan Museum of Art In the beginning we practise with a desire of some kind in mind; we practise on and on, but we don’t attain our desire. But if we continue to practise anyway, we reach a point where we’re practising without ideas of some kind of return; we just practise in order to let go. This is something we must see for ourselves; it’s very deep. Maybe we practise because we want to go to nibbana, but you won’t get to nibbana! It’s natural to want peace, but it’s not really correct. We must practise without wanting anything at all. If we don’t want anything at all, what will we get? We don’t get anything! The point is, whatever you get is a cause for suffering, so we practise ‘not getting anything’. Continue reading “Why do you want this holy water? By Ajahn Chah”

Nobody Likes Being Disturbed, by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu

Inner emptiness means to be normal, to have a mind that is not scattered and confused. Anyone who experiences this really likes it. If it develops to its greatest degree, which is to be empty of egoism, then it is Nibbana.

The Mountain is Empty; A Pinecone Falls, Zekkai Chūshin (Japanese, 1336–1405),© Metropolitan Museum of Art We must first be aware of these two categories, ’empty of I’ and ‘not empty of I’. The former is called ’empty’ and the latter is called ‘disturbed’ and to save time that is how they will be referred to from now on.

Here your common sense may say straight away that nobody likes being disturbed. If I were to ask those people who like being disturbed to raise their hands, if anyone did so it would have to be a joke. Everyone likes to be empty in one way or another. Some people like the lazy emptiness of not having to work. Everyone likes to be empty of annoyance, not having the kids coming to bother you. But that emptiness is an external thing, it is not yet true emptiness.

Inner emptiness means to be normal, to have a mind that is not scattered and confused. Anyone who experiences this really likes it. If it develops to its greatest degree, which is to be empty of egoism, then it is Nibbana. Continue reading “Nobody Likes Being Disturbed, by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu”

Dependent Origination, by Dalai Lama

Short talk by the Dalai Lama on the ‘law of causality and dependent origination’. About 25 minutes.

The Dalai LamaShort talk by the Dalai Lama on the ‘law of causality and dependent origination’. About 25 minutes.

Emptiness True Health, by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu

The medicine which cures the disease is the knowledge and practice that gives birth to emptiness. When emptiness has appeared it will be the cure of the disease and alter recovery from the disease there will be nothing save emptiness, the state void of Dukkha and. void of the mental defilements that are the cause of Dukkha

Miracle of Shravasti, Terracotta, 7th–9th century, Thailand © The Metropolitan Museum of ArtEmptiness is the most difficult to understand of all the Buddhist Teachings because it is their innermost heart. Being called a heart it must obviously be something subtle and profound. Its understanding does not lie within the scope of mere conjecture or the sort of pondering that ordinary people are accustomed to. It can only be understood by determined study.

The most essential meaning of the word ‘study’ is of the unceasing, dedicated observation and investigation of whatever arises in the mind, be it pleasant or unpleasant. Only one familiar with the observation of mind can really understand Dhamma. One who merely reads books cannot understand and what’s more may even go astray. But one who tries to observe the things going on in the mind and always takes that which is true in his or her own mind as a standard has no way to get, muddled. Such a person will be able to comprehend Dukkha and the cessation of Dukkha and ultimately will understand Dhamma. Then if books are read they will be understood well. Continue reading “Emptiness True Health, by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu”

Work with an Empty-Free Mind, by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu

If you don’t want to suffer, then work with an empty mind. Then work will be fun and the results will be excellent.

Work Must Be Practice

Blue Hydrangea.Work is an important problem for most of us, because we work to live. We can say our life has value because of work. This makes it a most important issue. Consequently, I like to raise work as a crucial issue.

An important problem for people is the issue of work, because we work to live. We can say our life has value because of work. This makes it a most important issue for us. Consequently, I like to focus on work as a crucial issue. On the back covers of our “Looking Within” series, I asked the publishers to print a little verse that concerns our topic.

Do work of all kinds with a free heart,
Offer the fruits of work to voidness,
Eat the food of emptiness as the noble ones do,
Die to one’s self from the very beginning. Continue reading “Work with an Empty-Free Mind, by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu”

Impermanence, Interdependence and Emptiness, Ringu Tulku

Short Buddhist video (about 8mins.) Ringu Tulku Rinpoche talks on the relationship between three understandings in Buddhist philosophy and how they go hand in hand: Impermanence, Interdependence and Emptiness…

Ringu Tulku RinpocheRingu Tulku Rinpoche talks on the relationship between three understandings in Buddhist philosophy and how they go hand in hand: Impermanence, Interdependence and, Emptiness. (8mins)

watch the Ringu Tulku Rinpoche video